1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Snails found at local rock pools.

Discussion in 'Invertebrates' started by wallie, Apr 28, 2013.

Users Viewing Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 0)

  1. wallie

    wallie Member

    Messages:
    36
    Tips: 0
    Hey guys whilst fishing this morning I came across several different species of snails and was wondering if they would be aquarium safe with my corals and fish , Would they just graze away at the algae and keep the sand nice like my turbans and ceriths ? or would they be escape artists ? Would they be likely to bring diseases into my aquarium ? I live on the mid north coast of nsw and the rock pool has fresh water coming over it continuously . I took some photos also , Cheers .

    Attached Files:

  2. Str8edge

    Str8edge Member

    Messages:
    255
    Country:
    Australia
    State:
    Vic
    Tips: 0
    the first to look kinda like turbos but im only new to this and never identified them from the wild before. The 2nd to that look like garden snails may be a problem snail i read something about snails like that the other week let me see if i can find it before you through them out i may be wrong as for the last 4 pics i havent seen in the trade before someone more qualified may be able to identify them for you.. i will see if i can find the article i read on the garden looking snails..
  3. Str8edge

    Str8edge Member

    Messages:
    255
    Country:
    Australia
    State:
    Vic
    Tips: 0
    Leaden Sand Snail

    Conuber sordidus

    This species, growing to 50mm, is one of the largest, most common sand snails found on sand-and mud-flats along the eastern and southern coasts of Australia. Like other sand snails, this is an active predator, preferring bivalve molluscs (especially tellins and clams) but also preying on other snails and in fact other species of sand snail. The animal burrows through surface layers of sand in search of prey. It uses its large foot to secure victims while the special drilling apparatus in the mouth forms a circular whole in the victim’s shell. The Leaden Sand Snail produces large, crescent-shaped egg-masses, composed of clear jelly and thousands of embryos. Such egg-masses are often confused with jellyfish, but are entirely harmless and should be left alone.
    Indigenous: Eastern and southern Australia.
    at0_gstatic_com_images_a8f12b03b671a62cbe9a3dd92d20cc04._.jpg
  4. Str8edge

    Str8edge Member

    Messages:
    255
    Country:
    Australia
    State:
    Vic
    Tips: 0
    the last snail looks similar to a limpet of some description was it difficult to remove from the rock??
  5. MTG

    MTG Lead Moderator VIP+ Member

    Messages:
    10,495
    Country:
    Australia
    State:
    Queensland
    Tips: 0
    Those are not turbos, don't risk your tank on snails from the beach... Way to much of a risk for something that costs so little
  6. wallie

    wallie Member

    Messages:
    36
    Tips: 0
    thanks for the help. Yeah i just had to put the backside of my knife under it and prise it up . Impossible nearly to get it off with just hands . It is quite large bigger then a 50c piece If that is a leaden sand snail i think ill leave it out of my tank lol dont want it "drilling " into any of my other snails
  7. wallie

    wallie Member

    Messages:
    36
    Tips: 0
    good call , thanks mate . Does anyone on classifieds sell snails every now and then ?
  8. MTG

    MTG Lead Moderator VIP+ Member

    Messages:
    10,495
    Country:
    Australia
    State:
    Queensland
    Tips: 0
    I wouldn't put any of those in my tank to be honest!
  9. Str8edge

    Str8edge Member

    Messages:
    255
    Country:
    Australia
    State:
    Vic
    Tips: 0
    yeh i wouldnt put them in.. if you have a member near you just ask them if they have some spare turbos usually reef tanks have heaps the breed like crazy and reefers dont mind culling the numbers and giving a few away.
  10. Str8edge

    Str8edge Member

    Messages:
    255
    Country:
    Australia
    State:
    Vic
    Tips: 0
    if you had to pry the other snail off with a knife it is most likely a limpet of some species it could be fine in the tank but like MTG said its not worth the risk
  11. chimaera

    chimaera enjoy the little things VIP+ Member

    Messages:
    5,593
    Country:
    Australia
    State:
    VIC
    Tips: 0
    Whatever kind of snail you find at a rockpool, it's fairly likely to crawl right out of your tank at some point.
    • Like Like x 1

Share This Page